The Teosofi: Jurnal Tasawuf dan Pemikiran Islam, published two times a year since 2011, is a peer-reviewed journal and furnishes an international scholarly forum for research on Sufism, Tariqa, Islamic Philosophy, Islamic Theology, and Islamic Thought. Taking an expansive view of the subject, the journal brings together all disciplinary perspectives. It publishes peer-reviewed articles on the historical, cultural, social, philosophical, political, anthropological, literary, artistic and other aspects of Sufism, Tariqa, Islamic Philosophy, Islamic Theology, Islamic Thought in all times and places. By promoting an understanding of the richly variegated Sufism, Tariqa, Islamic Philosophy, Islamic Theology, and Islamic Thought in both thought and practice and in its cultural and social contexts, the journal aims to become one of the leading platforms in the world for new findings and discussions of all fields of Islamic studies.

The journal warmly welcomes contributions from scholars of related disciplines. Articles should be original and unpublished and not under review for possible publication in other journals. All submitted papers are subject to review of the editors, editorial board, and blind reviewers. Submissions that violate our guidelines on formatting or length will be rejected without review.

Articles should be written in American English between approximately 6500-8500 words, including text, all tables, and figures, notes, references, and appendices intended for publication. All submissions must include 175 words abstract and five keywords. Quotations, passages, and words in local or foreign languages should be translated into English. Teosofi: Jurnal Tasawuf dan Pemikiran Islam accepts only electronic submissions. Therefore, authors must log in before submitting their articles. Please click here to log in.

All notes must appear in the text as citations. In a matter of bibliographical style, TEOSOFI: Jurnal Tasawuf dan Pemikiran Islam follows the Turabian style.

Sample Citations

The following examples illustrate the notes and bibliography style. Sample notes show full citations followed by shortened forms that would be used after the first citation. Sample bibliography entries follow the notes. For more details and many more examples, see chapters 16 and 17 of Turabian. (For examples of the same citations using the author-date system, go to Author-Date: Sample Citations.)

1. BOOK

Notes

Shabbir Akhtar, The Quran and the Secular Mind: A Philosophy of Islam (New York, NY: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group, 2008), 27.

Shortened Notes

Akhtar, The Quran, 27.

Bibliography Entry

Akhtar, Shabbir. The Quran and the Secular Mind: A Philosophy of Islam. New York, NY: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group, 2008.

2. CHAPTER OR OTHER PART OF AN EDITED BOOK

In a note, cite specific pages. In the bibliography, include the page range for the chapter or part.

Note

Mary Rowlandson, “The Narrative of My Captivity,” in The Making of the American Essay, ed. John D’Agata (Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2016), 19–20.

Shortened Note

Rowlandson, “Captivity,” 48.

Bibliography Entry

Rowlandson, Mary. “The Narrative of My Captivity.” in The Making of the American Essay, edited by John D’Agata, 19–56. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2016.

To cite an edited book as a whole, list the editor(s) first.

Note

John D’Agata, ed., The Making of the American Essay (Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2016), 19–20.

Shortened Note

D’Agata, American Essay, 48.

Bibliography Entry

D’Agata, John, ed. The Making of the American Essay. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2016.

3. TRANSLATED BOOK

Note

Jhumpa Lahiri, In Other Words, trans. Ann Goldstein (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2016), 146.

Shortened Note

Lahiri, In Other Words, 184.

Bibliography Entry

Lahiri, Jhumpa. In Other Words. Translated by Ann Goldstein. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2016.

4. E-BOOK

For books consulted online, include a URL or the name of the database. For other types of e-books, name the format. If no fixed page numbers are available, cite a section title or a chapter or other number in the notes or, if possible, track down a version with fixed page numbers.

Notes

Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the American Meal (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2001), 88, ProQuest Ebrary.

Shortened Notes

Schlosser, Fast Food Nation, 100.

Bibliography Entry

Schlosser, Eric. Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the American Meal. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2001. ProQuest Ebrary.

5. THESIS OR DISSERTATION

Note

Thoha Hamim, “Moenawar Chalil’s Reformist Thought: A Study of an Indonesian Religious Scholar 1908-1961” (PhD diss., McGill University, Montreal, 1996), 145-46.

Shortened Note

Hamim, “Moenawar Chalil’s Reformist Thought,” 145–46.

Bibliography Entry

Hamim, Thoha. “Moenawar Chalil’s Reformist Thought: A Study of an Indonesian Religious Scholar 1908-1961”. PhD diss., McGill University, Montreal, 1996.

6. JOURNAL ARTICLE

In a note, cite specific page numbers. In the bibliography, include the page range for the whole article. For articles consulted online, include a URL or the name of the database. Many journal articles list a DOI (Digital Object Identifier). A DOI forms a permanent URL that begins https://doi.org/. This URL is preferable to the URL that appears in your browser’s address bar.

Notes

Stephen Cúrto, “Sufi Qur’ānic Exegesis and Theomorphic Anthropology”, Teosofi: Jurnal Tasawuf dan Pemikiran Islam 10, no. 1 (June  2020): 29-49. https://doi.org/10.15642/teosofi.2020.10.1.29-49

Shortened Notes

Cúrto, “Sufi Qur’ānic Exegesis,” 29-49.

Bibliography Entry

Cúrto, Stephen. “Sufi Qur’ānic Exegesis and Theomorphic Anthropology.” Teosofi: Jurnal Tasawuf dan Pemikiran Islam 10, no. 1 (June  2020): 29-49. https://doi.org/10.15642/teosofi.2020.10.1.29-49

Journal articles often list many authors, especially in the sciences. If there are four or more authors, list up to ten in the bibliography; in a note, list only the first, followed by et al. (“and others”). For more than ten authors (not shown here), list the first seven in the bibliography, followed by et al.

Note

Mhd. Syahnan et al., “The Intellectual Network of Mandailing and Haramayn Muslim Scholars in the Mid-19th and Early 20th Centuries,” Teosofi: Jurnal Tasawuf dan Pemikiran Islam 9, no. 2 (December 2019): 257-281, https://doi.org/10.15642/teosofi.2019.9.2.257-281.  

Shortened Note

Syahnan et al., “The Intellectual Network,” 257–81.

Bibliography Entry

Syahnan, Mhd., Asrul, Ja’far.  “The Intellectual Network of Mandailing and Haramayn Muslim Scholars in the Mid-19th and Early 20th Centuries.” Teosofi: Jurnal Tasawuf dan Pemikiran Islam 9, no. 2 (December 2019): 257-281, https://doi.org/10.15642/teosofi.2019.9.2.257-281.  

7. NEWS OR MAGAZINE ARTICLE

Articles from newspapers or news sites, magazines, blogs, and the like are cited similarly. Page numbers, if any, can be cited in a note but are omitted from a bibliography entry. If you consulted the article online, include a URL or the name of the database.

Notes

Farhad Manjoo, “Snap Makes a Bet on the Cultural Supremacy of the Camera,” New York Times, March 8, 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html.

Shortened Notes

Manjoo, “Snap.”

Bibliography Entry

Manjoo, Farhad. “Snap Makes a Bet on the Cultural Supremacy of the Camera.” New York Times, March 8, 2017. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html.

8. BOOK REVIEW

Note

Fernanda Eberstadt, “Gone Guy: A Writer Leaves His Wife, Then Disappears in Greece,” review of A Separation, by Katie Kitamura, New York Times, February 15, 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/15/books/review/separation-katie-kitamura.html.

Shortened Note

Eberstadt, “Gone Guy.”

Bibliography Entry

Eberstadt, Fernanda. “Gone Guy: A Writer Leaves His Wife, Then Disappears in Greece.” Review of A Separation, by Katie Kitamura. New York Times, February 15, 2017. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/15/books/review/separation-katie-kitamura.html.

9. WEBSITE CONTENT

Web pages and other website content can be cited as shown here. For a source that does not list a date of publication, posting, or revision, include an access date (as in the Columbia example).

Notes

“Privacy Policy,” Privacy & Terms, Google, last modified April 17, 2017, https://www.google.com/policies/privacy/.

Shortened Notes

Google, “Privacy Policy.”

Bibliography Entry

Google. “Privacy Policy.” Privacy & Terms. Last modified April 17, 2017. https://www.google.com/policies/privacy/.

10. AUDIOVISUAL CONTENT

Notes

Kory Stamper, “From ‘F-Bomb’ to ‘Photobomb,’ How the Dictionary Keeps Up with English,” interview by Terry Gross, Fresh Air, NPR, April 19, 2017, audio, 35:25, http://www.npr.org/2017/04/19/524618639/from-f-bomb-to-photobomb-how-the-dictionary-keeps-up-with-english.

Shortened Notes

Stamper, interview.

Bibliography Entry

Stamper, Kory. “From ‘F-Bomb’ to ‘Photobomb,’ How the Dictionary Keeps Up with English.” Interview by Terry Gross. Fresh Air, NPR, April 19, 2017. Audio, 35:25. http://www.npr.org/2017/04/19/524618639/from-f-bomb-to-photobomb-how-the-dictionary-keeps-up-with-english.

11. SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT

Citations of content shared through social media can usually be limited to the text (as in the first example below). A note may be added if a more formal citation is needed or to include a link. In rare cases, a bibliography entry may also be appropriate. In place of a title, quote up to the first 160 characters of the post. Comments are cited in reference to the original post.

TEXT

Sloane Crosley offers the following advice: “How to edit: Attack a sentence. Write in the margins. Toss in some arrows. Cross out words. Rewrite them. Circle the whole mess and STET” (@askanyone, Twitter, May 8, 2017).

Notes

Pete Souza (@petesouza), “President Obama bids farewell to President Xi of China at the conclusion of the Nuclear Security Summit,” Instagram photo, April 1, 2016, https://www.instagram.com/p/BDrmfXTtNCt/.

Shortened Notes

Souza, “President Obama.”

Bibliography Entry

Chicago Manual of Style. “Is the world ready for singular they? We thought so back in 1993.” Facebook, April 17, 2015. https://www.facebook.com/ChicagoManual/posts/10152906193679151.

12. PERSONAL COMMUNICATION

Personal interviews, correspondence, and other types of personal communications—including email and text messages and direct messages sent through social media—are usually cited in the text or in a note only; they are rarely included in a bibliography.

Notes

Sam Gomez, Facebook message to author, August 1, 2017.

Interview with home health aide, July 31, 2017.

TRANSLITERATION

Letters: btthjkhddhrzsshghfqlmnhwy. Short vowels: aiu. long vowels: āīū. Diphthongs: awayTā marbūāt. Article: al-. For detailed information on Arabic Romanization, please refer to the transliteration system of the Library of Congress (LC) Guidelines.